Automated Near Real-Time Ventilator Data Feedback Reduces Incidence of Ventilator-Associated Events: A Retrospective Observational Study.
Augustus Oglesby HJ, Cataldo SH, Pedro MJ.
Critical care explorations. 2021; 3(4): e0379

Abstract

Objectives: Critical care teams are encouraged to follow best practice protocols to help wean mechanically ventilated patients from the ventilator to reduce ventilator-associated events including ventilator-associated conditions, probable ventilator-associated pneumonias, and infection-related ventilator-associated conditions. Providers monitor for alerts suggestive of possible ventilator-associated events and advise when patients should undergo spontaneous breathing trials. Compliance with protocols in most units is suboptimal. Design: Retrospective review of clinical data over 24 months. Setting: St. Joseph Mercy Hospital Candler Hospital Medical-Surgical ICU. Patients: All mechanically ventilated patients. Interventions: The Respiratory Knowledge Portal was implemented in our ICU. For 13 months, Respiratory Knowledge Portal data were ported to ICU workstations (control). For the following 11 months, Respiratory Knowledge Portal data were also presented on tablet computers (intervention) for use during multidisciplinary rounds. We performed a retrospective review of Respiratory Knowledge Portal data from before and after the implementation of the tablet computers. Measurements and Main RESULTS: Data were collected from 337 patients (187 control group, 150 intervention group). A decrease in the occurrence of ventilator-associated events was observed during the intervention group compared with the control group. Only 2.0% of patients in the intervention group experienced any category of ventilator-associated event, while 11.2% of patients in the control group experienced one event (p = 0.003). Intervention patients experienced less ventilator-associated conditions (p = 0.002), infection-related ventilator-associated conditions (p = 0.026), and probable ventilator-associated pneumonias (p = 0.036) than control patients. Twenty-one of the 24 patients with any ventilator-associated events were in the control group. There was no significant difference between the days spent on ventilation nor hospital length of stay in the control compared with intervention group patients. CONCLUSIONS: Fewer ventilator-associated events, ventilator-associated conditions, infection-related ventilator-associated conditions, and probable ventilator-associated pneumonias were seen during the period when Respiratory Knowledge Portal monitoring data was presented on tablet computers. There was no difference in time on ventilator nor overall length of stay. CI - Copyright (c) 2021 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the Society of Critical Care Medicine.



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