Taijiquan and qigong as a mindfulness cognitive-behavioural based therapy on the treatment of cothymia in school-age children - A preliminary study.
Rodrigues JM, Lopes L, Gonçalves M, Machado JP.
Journal of bodywork and movement therapies. 2021; 26(): 329-338

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: The development and well-being of children are directly linked to several aspects. Among those aspects, physical activity, an adequate nutrition, and a healthy mind, seem to be of crucial importance. Psychopathologies, such as anxiety and depression, have a negative impact on life, especially when co-occurring (mixed-anxiety depression disorder/cothymia), and the clinical implications include a higher risk of suicide and psychiatric hospitalization, elevated disability, decreased compliance with medical treatment, and considerably increased usage of medical services. Thus, research in conventional and nonconventional modalities is necessary to address this issue. The main objective of this study was to understand if TJQ and QG could be effective as a mindfulness cognitive-behavioural based therapeutic tool with body movement, for the treatment of children suffering from cothymia. METHODS: In this small study, six selected children, four males and two females aged between 7 and 11 years old, were taught a set of exercises of TaijiQuan (TJQ) and Qi Gong (QG). To obtain the results, the Achenbach Teacher's Report Form (TRF) was applied at the beginning of the experimental period, as well as at the ending of the experimental period. The resulting scores were analysed to observe the difference between both moments of evaluation. RESULTS: Results showed some improvements in symptoms, with an average improvement of 46%. CONCLUSION: TJQ and QG seem to be a promising complementary therapeutic tool in cognitive-behavioural approaches for children who suffer from cothymia, as well as prevention and control for children who may not display symptoms at a clinical level. However, further research is needed in order to understand the full potential of these therapeutic exercises. CI - Copyright (c) 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.



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