Interrelationship between climatic factors and incidence of FBD caused by Clostridioides difficile toxin B, Clostridium perfringens, Campylobacter spp., and Escherichia coli O157:H7.
Oh EJ, Kim JM, Kim JK.
Environmental science and pollution research international. 2021; ():

Abstract

Foodborne diseases (FBDs) remain a global public health concern. Climatic factors such as wind-chill temperature, rainfall, and relative humidity affect the incidence of several FBDs. This study was performed to analyze how the various factors of the climate influence the incidence and severity of FBDs. This study retrospectively analyzed the results of multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) tests for diarrhea-causing bacteria performed on 2300 fecal samples obtained from patients at Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan, from June 2010 to December 2019. The Clostridioides difficile toxin B infection rate positively correlated with the intensity of sunshine, and the content of particulate matter. The Campylobacter spp. infection rate positively correlated with wind-chill temperature and the content of particulate matter. The Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection rate positively correlated with relative humidity. These findings may explain the dynamics and risks of Clostridioides difficile toxin B, Clostridium perfringens, Campylobacter spp., and Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection. They may help predict interrelationships among climatic factors and standardize national environmental health policies. However, in-depth research with large-scale data, molecular biology, and epidemiology would be required going forward. Future research would also require objective indicators of the changes in the prevalence of FBD-causing microbial pathogens for the effective prevention and management of these bacterial infections.



P A G E S

Home
Journals
Keywords

P A R T N E R S

ScopeMed
BiblioMed
eJManager

Privacy Policy | citeindex.org © 2021