Striatal oxidative damages and neuroinflammation correlate with progression and survival of Lewy body and Alzheimer diseases.
Li H, Knight WC, Xu J.
Neural regeneration research. 2022; 17(4): 867-874

Abstract

Neurodegenerative diseases are a class of chronic and complex disorders featuring progressive loss of neurons in distinct brain areas. The mechanisms responsible for the disease progression in neurodegeneration are not fully illustrated. In this observational study, we have examined diverse biochemical parameters in the caudate and putamen of patients with Lewy body diseases (LBDs) and Alzheimer disease (AD), shedding some light on the involvement of oxidative damage and neuroinflammation in advanced neurodegeneration. We performed Spearman and Mantel-Cox analyses to investigate how oxidative stress and neuroinflammation exert comprehensive effects on disease progression and survival. Disease progression in LBDs correlated positively with poly (ADP-Ribose) and triggering receptors expressed on myeloid cell 2 levels in the striatum of LBD cohorts, indicating that potential parthanatos was a dominant feature of worsening disease progression and might contribute to switching microglial inflammatory phenotypes. Disease progression in AD corresponds negatively with 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) and myeloperoxidase concentrations in the striatum, suggesting that possible mitochondria dysfunction may be involved in the progression of AD via a mechanism of beta-amyloid entering the mitochondria and subsequent free radicals generation. Patients with lower striatal 8-oxo-dG and myeloperoxidase levels had a survival advantage in AD. The age of onset also affected disease progression. Tissue requests for the postmortem biochemistry, genetics, and autoradiography studies were approved by the Washington University Alzheimer's Disease Research Center (ADRC) Biospecimens Committee (ethics approval reference number: T1705, approval date: August 6, 2019). Recombinant DNA and Hazardous Research Materials were approved by the Washington University Environmental Health & Safety Biological Safety Committee (approval code: 3739, approval date: February 25, 2020). Radioactive Material Authorization was approved by the Washington University Environmental Health & Safety Radiation Safety Committee (approval code: 1056, approval date: September 18, 2019).



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